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posted By Home In Italy on September 29th, 2016
Here’s what Alessandra Tibollo wrote in the magazine La Cucina Italiana on the best breakfasts to do in Rome. Ten high glycemic addresses to start the day, from the traditonal maritozzo to Anglo pancakes, through brioche and croissants strictly based on butter or even just a coffee. Then there are the classics, to feel like newly Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn in “Roman Holiday”, from Sant’Eustachio coffee and maritozzi from Regoli.. Without forgetting the international addresses for those who can not do without a scrambled egg in the morning.
La Portineria
Via Reggio Emilia, 22. An entrance that you do not expect, hidden, cramped, a few steps down and then it opens into a huge room, bright and spacious. For the record Gian Luca Forino, the pastry chef, is also a “famous person”, after finishing second in the show “The biggest confectioner”. His desserts are strict in appearance and processing, as well as pralines, chocolate-filled bombs that will flood the palate. Just to mention the yeasts: 3 days of total work to get to a perfect result. Needless to say that nutella is made by real chocolate, jams and marmalades are all homemade.
Coromandel
Via di Monte Giordano, 60. Sit back and get ready for a different experience, not the usual coffee and croissant at the bar, but a fine service ‘the English way’, which starts at 8.30am. The place is a delightful retreat in the center of Rome, a few steps from Piazza Navona. Also here you can take coffee and croissant or pain au chocolat – strictly homemade – but the advice is to go further and enjoy, if you really do not want to stray into English breakfast with scrambled eggs or omelets, a dish of pancakes or a French toast. And a fresh centrifuge could be a good solution to start to day.
Pasticceria De Bellis
Piazza del Paradiso, 56. It is not very spacious, but here you eat one of the best croissants in the capital. The use of the French term is no coincidence, since the pastry chef Andrea De Bellis has studied in France and perfected his flaking techniques.
Sant’Eustachio
Piazza Sant’Eustachio, 82. Worth to mention not for the croissants, which come from an outside workshop, but for the coffee. For the Romans Sant’Eustachio is coffee: here you drink and buy the ground coffee or the beans in order to prepare it at home just like at the bar. Prepare for a long queue, because this bar is at the back of Campo dei Fiori, signaled by all the tourist guides. This will be enough to start the day.
Barberini
Via Marmorata, 41. Despite the name, this bar is not near Piazza Barberini, but in Testaccio. Don’t be suspicious by the entrance being a bit retro, because during breakfast you will be amazed by the queue to get one of the delicious croissants, which rarely exceed the early hours of the day. Assortment of creams and jams, to suit all tastes.
posted in News
posted By Home In Italy on September 27th, 2016

After many trips all around the world, this year we decided to go to Puglia a little bit “out of season”, in late September, to avoid the confusion of the summer months. We rented a villa in Salento and one in the Valle d’Itria through http://www.homeinitaly.com/luxury-villas-puglia.php.
The houses were both very comfortable and clean, a few kms from the beaches.
During the week in Salento we made two trips: one day we visited the Adriatic coast of Salento and another day Gallipoli.
We started from Pescoluse along the coast headed to Punta del Tacco.

Santa Maria di Leuca is a lovely place where you can enjoy a beautiful view with the two seas, while Otranto will enchant you with the bright blue color of the sea overlooking the main square of the town. A recommended stop is the Baia dei Turchi beach, just north of Otranto.


The second tour was in Gallipoli. This is a lively city a few km from Pescoluse. Not to miss, an excursion to Punta Prosciutto, another sandy beach on the Ionian coast.
After a beautiful sunny week we moved to the north, in the Valle D’Itria region. On the way to the north of Puglia, certainly a stop in Lecce is a must.
First stop in the Valle d’Itria is the white town of Ostuni, really lovely.

We visited the Castellana Grotte, a path of 3 km underground, 3km of wonders, 2h must-visit!
Finally, Alberobello is a true open-air museum and Polignano a Mare is a beautiful place to visit. All around, kilometers of red clay countryside and olive trees. Amazing!

posted By Home In Italy on September 23rd, 2016

Just in time for fall, our favorite dessert – with a strong twist of cinnamon!

Ingredients

  • 800 gr apple
  • 200 gr flour
  • 170 gr sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 125 gr melted butter
  • Lemon zest of 1 lemon
  • 16 gr baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • 1 spoon of cinnamon powder

Directions

Peel the apples, cut them into quarters and remove the central core; cut into 1 cm thick slices, and get the cubes. Extract the seeds inside the vanilla bean and add the melted butter in a small pan.

Meanwhile, put in a large bowl the eggs and add sugar.
Beat eggs with an electric mixer for 10 minutes, until they become clear and creamy; then unireil just warm butter.

Take a bowl and sift the flour, cinnamon and baking powder. then mix gently and add the salt and lemon zest; when everything is well blended, combine the flours with the apples cut in cubes and pour the mixture into a cake pan of 24 cm diameter opening circle will have been buttered and floured (or covered with parchment paper).

Bake the pie at 175 degrees for about 50 minutes. Sprinkle the icing sugar on your cake and, if you like the strong taste of cinnamon, you can mix up a bit of cinnamon powder with the icing sugar.

A perfect treat during your fall afternoons!

posted By Home In Italy on September 19th, 2016

The 71st edition will be held during September, with a route even richer than the past editions, with twenty-four events divided over eleven places.
The festival will start in Perugia, with concerts in the splendid Basilica of ‘San Pietro’, in the historical theatre ‘Morlacchi’, in the Templar church of ‘San bevignate’, in the National Gallery, in the cathedral of ‘San Lorenzo’ and will continue in the collegiate church of ‘Santa Maria Maggiore’ in Collescipoli, in the museum of ‘San Francesco di Montefalco’, in the abbey of ‘San Nicolò’ of San Gemini, in the sanctuary of ‘Mongiovino di Panicale’, in the Superior Basilica of ‘San Francesco’ of Assisi, in the public theatre of Bevagna, in the cloister of ‘San Francesco’ of Acquasparta and in the auditorium ‘Sant’ Antonio’ of Torgiano.
From this edition the Umbrian Music Festival will offer a special showcase for young talents from Umbria with “aperitif concerts” at ‘Palazzo della Penna’ in Perugia, with five meetings with graduates of the academy of music. Anna Calabro, president of the foundation ‘Perugia Musica Classica’, says: “After nearly 80 years of history, the 71st edition, considering the period of detention during the Second World War, the Sagra Musicale Umbra is part of the cultural traditions of our region and it characteristics, in part, the identity. The offered music is part of the landscape and the many special places that Umbria preserved as treasures. The presence in this edition of so many different places in Umbria, like Perugia, Panicale, Passignano, Torgiano, Umbertide, Acquasparta, Assisi, Bevagna, Montefalco, San Gemini, Terni, shows how the Sagra Musicale Umbra is a real “Umbrian” festival albeit in its orientation towards the world.

Returning in these special places over the years increases the value, because the fascination grows with the contribution of a public that increasingly attentive, participates in the ritual music. And that is why, even with the difficulties of nowadays, is offered with great enthusiasm, a precious moment of spiritual enrichment through music and the places that history has given us. Artistic director Alberto Batista says that the tradition of spiritual singing in Umbria has its antic heart set in the repertoire of ‘Laude Franciscan’, born as a naïve poetry in the XIII century.
The most important witness of this heritage, which continues to be handed down and chanted until today thanks to the persistence of Laudesi companies spread in the region, is located in the illustration “code 91” of the Etruscan Academy in Cortona, universally known as “Laudario of Cortona”.

From this incunabula branches off a rich and unbroken tradition of oral transmission and variants that have remained for centuries and they continue to be kept alive in popular devotional practices. To this heritage, the 71st Sagra Musicale Umbra inspires itself, holding the laud and Franciscan spirituality as a compass through a route even more richer than past editions, in the timeframe of eleven days, twenty-four events will be held divided by eleven different locations, chosen for its monumental beauty and for its famous ruins of a spiritual heritage, artistic and unique in the world.