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INTERNATIONAL MASERATI CENTENNIAL GATHERING

posted by Home In Italy on September 3rd, 2014

Three days from Modena to Turin, with a racetrack stop in Cremona, to celebrate Maserati’s first century. The International Maserati Centennial Gathering will be held from September 18 through September 20. The three days will see a succession of exhibitions, parades, a regularity race, a track test, a visit to the two Maserati factories and a concours d’elegance. Cars and collectors from all over the world are expected to be in attendance.

A hundred years have gone by since, in December of 1914, Alfieri Maserati and his brothers Ettore and Ernesto opened the first car repair workshop in a basaement on Via de’ Pepoli, Bologna. Here they began to prepare and modify cars for themselves – the three Maserati brothers were also rather capable drivers – and the gentlemen drivers of those heroic days. These were the first steps of a company that in time was to become an international icon of Italian motoring.

The Maserati Centennial Gathering will begin in the morning on Thursday, September 18, in Modena with the arrival of the historic and contemporary models that will be taking part in the event and their display in some of the most captivating urban spaces. The next day, Friday, September 19, the participants will make their way to Turin, with a stop in the San Martino del Lago circuit and a parade through the streets of Cremona. The afternoon of Saturday, September 20, will see the concluding event: the Concours d’Elegance in Piazza San Carlo.

Do not miss the possibility to participate to this glorious event and rent one of our luxury villas in the North of Italy. Enjoy the amazing landscape and shores of the Como Lake, the nature and culture of the Garda Lake and the beauty of Portofino, with its picturesque harbor and the brightly-colored houses.

GLASS ARTS IN MURANO

posted by Home In Italy on March 18th, 2014

Artisan tradition and a manufacture that combines industrial, manual and technological techniques have for centuries characterized and exalted the Italian art of glassmaking. A segment of the luxury sector and synonomous with Italian design, glassmaking on the Peninsula calls the Venetian isle of Murano its epicenter – at least since the 8th Century – Murano being the famous brand name that is known and imported throughout the world.

On Murano, packed with Renaissance-style houses and in part defined by its dominant white lighthouse, glass production stands as the highest expression of refined objets and furnishings. It is an expression realized over time by several dynasties of master glassmakers, passing down this art of transforming sand with air and fire, and maintaining an archive of knowledge that has been kept very hush-hush on this semi-secluded little island.

Some maintain that the glass arts hark back to ancient Egypt, whence the tradition arrived in old Rome for the purpose of adorning noble residences. Yet it was with Eastern and Arab influences that glass design and manufacture was further refined throughout the centuries. More specifically, such took place in Venice, but not in Venice proper – rather, on the outlying island of Murano, where the possibility of large and dangerous fires (as a result of the glassmaking process) destroying the Most Serene Republic was minimized.

The creation of objects in glass is rather complex, both materially and economically, which is why early on glassmakers enjoyed certain immunities and were allowed to possess swords for self-defense; the catch is they could never be permitted to leave the Republic, in the regrettable case that the secrets of the glass arts might be given up by any mode or means.

For this, Murano’s glassmakers held a tight monopoly on both quality and manufacturing techniques, including millefiori, crystal or lead glass, glazed, and milk glass, up until the re-discovery of ancient Roman glass, today’s murrine.

Murano is still the foremost hub of artisan labs for both artistic and mass commercial production. One of the standouts among the most unique, original creations are glass objects imitating precious stones. Of course many of Venice’s historic glass ateliers have become international household names, including Salviati, Barovier & Toso, FerroMurano, and Berengo Studio.

Tourists in Venice seek out the workshops of the grand maestros – that, by the way, assisted Picasso, Fontana and Chagall in creating their own glass sculptures. Here visitors can acquire light fixtures, goblets and chalices, jewelry and vases – thin as paper or thick like marble, white like porcelain or cold-painted.  Before visiting the Museo del Vetro in Palazzo Giustinian, witness the glassmaking of Murano in person to appreciate the expert techniques used to shape and form these works. Viewing the manufacturing process up close truly makes the final product come alive in a brand new way.

EXCLUSIVE WINE TASTING

posted by Home In Italy on November 23rd, 2013

Home in Italy would like to welcome its guests in Umbria with a special gift. They are kindly invited to experience an exclusive Wine Tasting in Enoteca Properzio, Spello, Umbria.

Imagine entering a room with ancient origins, dating back to medieval times, where the atmosphere is warm and welcoming. This is Enoteca Properzio, one of the most popular wine stores in Italy, not only for the high quality of its products, but also for the context in which it is inserted.

The wine tasting experience is a trip through intense, fruity aromas and some of the best sparkling Italian and foreign wines, a memorable experience of senses.

Everything that the enoteca of your dreams would have, is here: marble floor, prosciutto slicer, coffee machine, cheeses beyond inventory, hams galore, that wonderful aroma of Italian food shops and some 2,200 wines alongside typical Umbrian products” (The Independent Traveller).

The wine bar Enoteca Properzio, in the heart of Umbria, carries more than 2,200 labels, along with wine pairings – olive oils, honey, marmalades, sauces, mushrooms, truffles, and more” (New York Living).

A wine-tasting featuring the best vintages of Italy’s premier winemakers” (Condè Nast Traveler).

Recently voted one of Italy’s top ten wine shops by an Italian wine magazine, this enoteca gives serious wine buffs a run for their money. Presided over by the enthusiastic Angelini brothers, it stocks some 2,200 global wines, including a vast selection from Umbria. The enoteca occupies part of Palazzo dei Canonici, its sleek contemporary styling encased in ancient bricks vaults” (Time Out).

Today the free Wine Tasting is available only for Umbria bookings because of the location of the enoteca.

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF CINEMA, TURIN

posted by Home In Italy on November 6th, 2013

This unique exhibit space is an Italian motion picture museum.

It is one of the most important of its kind in the world thanks to its vast collection and the many different scientific and educational activities it carries out.

But what makes it truly unique is its special exhibit setup. The museum is located inside the Mole Antonelliana, a bizarre and fascinating monument which is the symbol of the City of Turin. And the various areas inside the Mole Antonelliana were the starting point for the Swiss set designer François Confino who, with talent and imagination, multiplied the museum’s itineraries.

He created a spectacular presentation that offers visitors unexpected visual and acoustic stimuli, just like when we watch a film that involves and moves us.

Different halls have screens showing different clips for a specific genre of film. There are also exhibits on the process of making films and on film history.

Best of all for true movie buffs: the museum’s unrivaled collection of vintage movie posters.

The Museum is more than a museum and whoever enters it isn’t just a visitor but also an explorer, an author, an actor, a spectator… to whom the Museum offers the emotions of an experience not to be easily forgotten.