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WHAT ARE THE BEST VEG RESTAURANTS IN ITALY?

posted by Home In Italy on May 2nd, 2017

Vegan Italy states: “According to the Eurispes report, every week in Italy 6,000 people become vegans”.
Talking about vegans and numbers: 3% of the population is vegan, 6% of the population no longer eats meat or fish, therefore they are vegetarians, and 3% rejects all animal products.

Eurispes is a private institute that conducts studies and researches on behalf of companies, public and private entities, and it publishes the Report Italia every year, an analysis on the state of politics, economy and Italian society.
The new factor, in addition to the decisive growth, is represented by the decrease of vegetarians in favor of the vegan group.
This is a clear sign of the rising awareness on the exploitation of animals at all levels of food production. The awareness is rising also thanks to the constant work in spreading information on the reality of the breeding farms and what lies behind the production of milk, eggs and derivatives.
A question of great cultural centrality, but in particular – and consequently – a gastronomic challenge that many restaurateurs, for ethical or commercial reasons, can not ignore.

In recent years, in the wake of Pieter Leemann (restaurant Joia in Milan), restaurants and pastry shops dedicated to a healthier and more conscious lifestyle spread everywhere in the peninsula,.
Sushi lovers have become vegetarians thanks to the avocado, states Repubblica, pasta is dressed only in three different ways (oil, butter and parmesan and ragu sauce), arancini are made with pistachios. There even exists the “Roman Vegorino”.

Vegan cuisine seminars have become famous thanks to chef Simone Salvini, author of “Viaggia Vegan” together with the non profit association Food Vibration. Viaggia Vegan is the first Italian guide for those who follow the cruelty free diet made up of only veg structures; the itinerant school Organic Academy has hundreds of applications in the waiting list.
You can call it fashion, but the veg people will talk about more awareness. In any case, Italy is now the third European country with the largest number of veg restaurants, preceded only by Germany and England.

If you have planned a vacation in Italy in a luxury villa fully staffed or just self-catered, but you do not want to go out for dinner and you are veg, don’t worry! There is a place for you.
Here are some examples:

Crepapelle, Florence
In this Florentine restaurant you can experience veganism in the street version: crèpes, kebabs, sandwiches, panzerotti, even fried dishes (there are Buffalo wings made with cauliflower with barbecue sauce!). There is not even the4 shadow of animals or their derivatives, yet there is an appreciable attempt to reinvent the concept of ‘sad kitchen ‘and make it more appealing also by that type of clientele that does not disagree with the greasy and grimy (green version of course).

Apriti Sesamo, Parma
The Parma temple of Veg quotes Alì Babà, but instead of the 40 thieves there are 20 years of experience in a field that has made a relatively recent boom. Sesamo has begun its journey from a bioenergetic restaurant (as Antonella and Mimmo define it), and today it is a well-established reality that is based on strictly organic food, curated recipes, great variety.
A take away menu is dedicated to the veg-lazy people who prefer the home table, while for dinner (during weekends) there is a tasting menu to bring the seitan world even closer to the most skeptic ones.

Il Margutta Ristorarte, Rome


For the most convinced vegetarians, this place is not a novelty, since Margutta is alive and active since ’79. And during these 30 years it has been refined, strengthened and embellished and it has now to become a gem for gourmet vegetarians and for refined vegans. The “light gourmet” version of vegetarian, vegan (and raw in some cases) dishes offered in the several evening tasting menus are also food for the eyes. The one to instagram straight away!

Ops!, Rome


Fast formula with no waste. It is a vegan buffet that is rich and always different, to choose according to cravings and mood and pay by weight. Nothing too elegant, just a place where the quality and quantity of choice are the real added value. Together to the chef’s name Simone Salvini, who publishes veg books for Mondadori and that, besides being an expert in the kitchen, has a PhD in Psychology. Thoughtful dishes, right?
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Suribachy, Catania
Biological, vegan, whole. Suribachy’s cuisine in Catania has now become a habit for the vegan and vegetarian Sicilians, but if you happen to be around you should try it even as a tourist. I know that avoiding the fish in Sicily could be a deadly sin even just for one meal. However, even island vegetables are not bad, right? They also offer a good selection of Sicilian organic wines.
Luxury villas in Sicily

Mantra Raw Vegan, Milano


Only a few steps away from Joia there is a gem of raw vegan cuisine.
Fantasy and originality (with the double vegan and raw bond) not that ordinary, and yet they succeeded by offering a varied and detailed menu, with unexpected lyrical peaks and tons of macadamia. Beverages and cocktails (including alcoholic saké drinks), juices and centrifuges to accompany the whole. An experience recommended also to the most skeptic ones.

Joia, Milan


The first vegetarian restaurant to enter the magical world of the Michelin Guide and with very high bills. Here the natural cuisine has a philosophical and researched touch.
It has now become a pilgrimage destination for vegetarians and vegans in luxury mood. It is possible to feel the mysticism of Peter Leemann, born in Switzerland, but an oriental guru in his spirit.

CROSTATA WITH RICOTTA AND FIGS

posted by Home In Italy on October 10th, 2016
Ingredients:
flour 165 g
almond flour 70 gr
butter 100g
icing sugar 95 gr
medium eggs 1
1 vanilla bean
salt 3 gr
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
ricotta 400g
isinglass 8 gr
fig jam 400 gr
Liquid fresh cream 200g
Directions:
Combine flour  and the cold butter cut. Stir flour almond and cinnamon . Combine the icing sugar, the inner seeds of the vanilla bean, eggs and salt. Transfer the dough on floured work surface. Briefly work to get a loaf. Wrap the dough in plastic and leave in the freezer for an hour. Then roll out the dough until it becomes a centimeter thick. Lay the mold lined with parchment paper. Bake the base in the oven at 175 ° for 35 minutes. Allow to cool the shell and transfer it to a plate.
Prepare the ricotta in a bowl and, in a small saucepan heat the cream. Melt the gelatin in cold water and add to the ricotta. then add the fig jam. Stuff the base filling it with cream and then it level well in area.
Wash and dry the figs, then cut in half without removing the peel. Add the figs on the cake and allow yourself to this delicacy!

THE BEST 10 BREAKFASTS TO DO IN ROME: PART 2

posted by Home In Italy on October 4th, 2016

Here’s what Alessandra Tibollo wrote in the magazine La Cucina Italiana on the best breakfasts to do in Rome. Ten high glycemic addresses to start the day, from the traditonal maritozzo to Anglo pancakes, through brioche and croissants strictly based on butter or even just a coffee. Then there are the classics, to feel like newly Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn in “Roman Holiday”, from Sant’Eustachio coffee and maritozzi from Regoli.. Without forgetting the international addresses for those who can not do without a scrambled egg in the morning.

Panella


Via Merulana, 54.  A little bakery, a little bar, a little pastry. At via Merulana, Panella exists already for many decades, even if its prices are not exactly cheap. For breakfast, however, the prices are in line with the market. One of the best bakeries in Rome, but we should mention the small cakes as well. The coffee is delicious and during the spring and summer time it is a pleasure to sit outside near the entrance.

Cristalli di zucchero – Via Valtellina, 114 – Via di San Teodoro, 88. The main bakery is in Via Valtellina, in the Monteverde area. Mark Rinella one of the best pastry chefs of the capital. However, it is difficult not to be attracted by the counter, in particular by the portions, from mignon and tartlets. But to appreciate the creativity of the chef at its best you should try the tiramisu, cheesecake, Sorrento, just to name a few of them.

Regoli


via dello Statuto, 60. You can not say to have been in Rome if you haven’t been at least once at Regoli to have breakfast based on “maritozzi”. Beware that by 11am they are all finished, both the classic version as well as the one with cream inside. The vintage atmosphere, immersed in the most multi-ethnic district of the capital, the Esquiline. Around the corner there is Piazza Vittorio, with its sparkling chinoiserie and ethnic restaurants.

Pasticceria Bompiani – Corso Benedetto Bompiani, 8. Walter Musco, confectioner Bompiani, it has revolutionized the concept of sweets and especially chocolate. An example are the Easter eggs, so beautiful that they are the protagonists of a show that is repeated annually. Beautiful and inviting  are even the cakes, while the biscuits dominate the essentiality.

Bakery House

Corso Trieste, 157b / c – Via Riano, 11. The percentage of admirers of American breakfast grows and you can not report a good address – or rather two, since it has dual headquarters – for pancakes served with fresh fruit and maple syrup or chocolate; cupcakes in different variants; NY bagel to be stuffed with cream cheese, Philadelphia or butter and jam; scones with chocolate chips; cinnamon buns; cookies, in different offers. And for those who can not do without a fried egg to start the day, even cooked eggs in many different ways, with accompanying toast or bagels.

Neapolitan pizza, a UNESCO heritage

posted by Home In Italy on March 15th, 2016

The petition in support of the Neapolitan pizza makers as UNESCO intangible heritage has reached one million signatures all around the world.

Already enrolled in the Guinness World Records for having won the official world record for the length of 1595.45 meters pizza at Expo 2015, Italy now points to UNESCO. Well yes; Italy claims paternity of the Neapolitan pizza and sends one million and 38 thousand signatures to the UNESCO world headquarters in Paris, after having received support from some cultural and social institutions around the world from London to New York, from Buenos Aires from Sao Paulo to Las Vegas to Japan and Australia. The passion for pizza sees the Americans as the largest consumers of pizza with 13 kg each and Italians at the head of the European ranking followed by the Spanish, the French, the Germans, the British, the Belgians, the Portuguese and by the Austrians.

Neapolitan pizza, was officially recognized as a traditional specialty guaranteed by the European Union, but food piracy and misappropriation of identity, very common for Italian food, pushed the trade associations to reach an international recognition. Every day in Italy are served around 5 million of pizzas for a total of a billion and a half in a year in the 63 thousand pizzerias around the country. It is not a coincidence that today 39 percent of Italians believe that the pizza is the Italian culinary symbol and that pizza is the most known Italian word abroad with 8 percent, followed by cappuccino (7 per percent), spaghetti (7 percent) and from the espresso (6 percent).