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CROSTATA WITH RICOTTA AND FIGS

posted by Home In Italy on October 10th, 2016
Ingredients:
flour 165 g
almond flour 70 gr
butter 100g
icing sugar 95 gr
medium eggs 1
1 vanilla bean
salt 3 gr
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
ricotta 400g
isinglass 8 gr
fig jam 400 gr
Liquid fresh cream 200g
Directions:
Combine flour  and the cold butter cut. Stir flour almond and cinnamon . Combine the icing sugar, the inner seeds of the vanilla bean, eggs and salt. Transfer the dough on floured work surface. Briefly work to get a loaf. Wrap the dough in plastic and leave in the freezer for an hour. Then roll out the dough until it becomes a centimeter thick. Lay the mold lined with parchment paper. Bake the base in the oven at 175 ° for 35 minutes. Allow to cool the shell and transfer it to a plate.
Prepare the ricotta in a bowl and, in a small saucepan heat the cream. Melt the gelatin in cold water and add to the ricotta. then add the fig jam. Stuff the base filling it with cream and then it level well in area.
Wash and dry the figs, then cut in half without removing the peel. Add the figs on the cake and allow yourself to this delicacy!

THE BEST 10 BREAKFASTS TO DO IN ROME: PART 2

posted by Home In Italy on October 4th, 2016

Here’s what Alessandra Tibollo wrote in the magazine La Cucina Italiana on the best breakfasts to do in Rome. Ten high glycemic addresses to start the day, from the traditonal maritozzo to Anglo pancakes, through brioche and croissants strictly based on butter or even just a coffee. Then there are the classics, to feel like newly Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn in “Roman Holiday”, from Sant’Eustachio coffee and maritozzi from Regoli.. Without forgetting the international addresses for those who can not do without a scrambled egg in the morning.

Panella


Via Merulana, 54.  A little bakery, a little bar, a little pastry. At via Merulana, Panella exists already for many decades, even if its prices are not exactly cheap. For breakfast, however, the prices are in line with the market. One of the best bakeries in Rome, but we should mention the small cakes as well. The coffee is delicious and during the spring and summer time it is a pleasure to sit outside near the entrance.

Cristalli di zucchero – Via Valtellina, 114 – Via di San Teodoro, 88. The main bakery is in Via Valtellina, in the Monteverde area. Mark Rinella one of the best pastry chefs of the capital. However, it is difficult not to be attracted by the counter, in particular by the portions, from mignon and tartlets. But to appreciate the creativity of the chef at its best you should try the tiramisu, cheesecake, Sorrento, just to name a few of them.

Regoli


via dello Statuto, 60. You can not say to have been in Rome if you haven’t been at least once at Regoli to have breakfast based on “maritozzi”. Beware that by 11am they are all finished, both the classic version as well as the one with cream inside. The vintage atmosphere, immersed in the most multi-ethnic district of the capital, the Esquiline. Around the corner there is Piazza Vittorio, with its sparkling chinoiserie and ethnic restaurants.

Pasticceria Bompiani – Corso Benedetto Bompiani, 8. Walter Musco, confectioner Bompiani, it has revolutionized the concept of sweets and especially chocolate. An example are the Easter eggs, so beautiful that they are the protagonists of a show that is repeated annually. Beautiful and inviting  are even the cakes, while the biscuits dominate the essentiality.

Bakery House

Corso Trieste, 157b / c – Via Riano, 11. The percentage of admirers of American breakfast grows and you can not report a good address – or rather two, since it has dual headquarters – for pancakes served with fresh fruit and maple syrup or chocolate; cupcakes in different variants; NY bagel to be stuffed with cream cheese, Philadelphia or butter and jam; scones with chocolate chips; cinnamon buns; cookies, in different offers. And for those who can not do without a fried egg to start the day, even cooked eggs in many different ways, with accompanying toast or bagels.

Neapolitan pizza, a UNESCO heritage

posted by Home In Italy on March 15th, 2016

The petition in support of the Neapolitan pizza makers as UNESCO intangible heritage has reached one million signatures all around the world.

Already enrolled in the Guinness World Records for having won the official world record for the length of 1595.45 meters pizza at Expo 2015, Italy now points to UNESCO. Well yes; Italy claims paternity of the Neapolitan pizza and sends one million and 38 thousand signatures to the UNESCO world headquarters in Paris, after having received support from some cultural and social institutions around the world from London to New York, from Buenos Aires from Sao Paulo to Las Vegas to Japan and Australia. The passion for pizza sees the Americans as the largest consumers of pizza with 13 kg each and Italians at the head of the European ranking followed by the Spanish, the French, the Germans, the British, the Belgians, the Portuguese and by the Austrians.

Neapolitan pizza, was officially recognized as a traditional specialty guaranteed by the European Union, but food piracy and misappropriation of identity, very common for Italian food, pushed the trade associations to reach an international recognition. Every day in Italy are served around 5 million of pizzas for a total of a billion and a half in a year in the 63 thousand pizzerias around the country. It is not a coincidence that today 39 percent of Italians believe that the pizza is the Italian culinary symbol and that pizza is the most known Italian word abroad with 8 percent, followed by cappuccino (7 per percent), spaghetti (7 percent) and from the espresso (6 percent).

Historical Coffee Houses in Venice

posted by Home In Italy on December 15th, 2015

When talking about historical coffee houses, you cannot help but mentioning Venice. It is in the lagoon city that the coffee tradition was born thanks to its location and the trade relations with the Arab world. The real explosion of the phenomenon “coffee house” takes place in the 1700, with the launch of numerous clubs. Among them, the most famous and the oldest one is definitely the caffé Florian, which is still the symbol of the city. A tour among the best known historical Venetian coffee houses starts here, right under the arcades of the Procuratie Nuove in St. Mark’s Square.

Caffè Florian was founded in 1720 opened under the name “Alla Venezia Trionfante” (Venice the Triumphant). Since the beginning, this elegant building was characterized by its exclusive products and acquaintances: it was the place where politicians and intellectuals met (such as Carlo Goldoni and Casanova and, more recently, Gabriele d’Annunzio).
Today, the Caffé Florian still maintains the charm of the times it lived. With its architecture, the result of restoration and reconstruction, and the richly decorated interiors, the caffè is an important cultural center and, at the same time, a perfect place to enjoy an espresso a few steps from the Grand Canal.

Always in St. Mark square, there is another historic café; after Stendhal, Lord Byron, Alexandre Dumas, Wagner, Marcel Proust, even today, the Gran Caffe Quadri is the favorite place for actors and directors attending the Venice Film Festival in Venice, including Woody Allen.

More recent, but equally fascinating, the history of Harry’s Bar begins in 1931. Built from an old warehouse next to St. Mark square, in this place spent time intellectuals, artists and writers such as Arturo Toscanini, Guglielmo Marconi, Charlie Chaplin, Orson Welles and Peggy Guggenheim.

In the Lido area, finally, is the Lion’s bar, designed in 1925 to offer visitors and tourists a shining example of the Art Deco.