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posts tagged ‘ what to see in italy ’

It’s winter time … and time to explore Italy!

posted by Home In Italy on November 22nd, 2017

For those who do not mind low temperature, winter can be a great time to discover Italy! Fewer tourists, less crowded museums and shorter lines: during this season, opera, symphony and theaters are in full swing, meaning lots of opportunities for visitors. So take a sweater, a rain jacket, wear a scarf and a winter hat and enjoy your holiday!

Why travel to Italy in winter time?
Here are just a few of the reasons why it’s worth making a trip during the tourist low-season in Italy. First of all, it will be much less crowded at some of the most popular and historic spots than it is during summer time. Secondly, you will find good prices on airfares to almost all Italian airport.

Winter weather in Italy ranges from relatively mild along the coasts of Sardinia, Sicily and the southern mainland to very cold and snowy inland, especially in the northern mountains. Even popular tourist destinations like Venice, Florence, and the hill towns of Tuscany and Umbria can get a dusting of snow in winter.

Winter is a good time for cultural events and performances in Italy’s elegant historic theaters. Naples is one of the top cities for Christmas nativities and many people visit Rome for the midnight mass on Christmas Eve. Early winter sunsets mean more time to enjoy cities after dark. Many cities light their historic monuments at night so strolling through a city after dark can be beautiful and romantic.

There’s a lot to do on a winter vacation in Italy!
When winter comes around and the crowds die down there are some truly extraordinary things you can see and do.
Spending winter in Italy may not be something you’ve previously considered, but the country is just as spectacular at this time of year as it is over summer. So, take a look at some of the wonderful events and experiences you can attend, making your winter break to Italy unforgettable.

Take a cooking class: Italy is famous for its delicious food and fine wine, and taking an authentic cooking class will open your mind and taste buds to some sensational flavours. Take a cooking class from a local chef and learn how to replicate some of the most exquisite Italian dishes at home. This is a great activity to do if the weather isn’t on your side, as you can escape the harsh weather whilst still enjoying your holiday.

Head to the theatre: purchasing a ticket for the theatre in Italy is one of the smartest moves you can make. You will not only escape the cold but will also get the opportunity to view some of the most unique shows in Europe.

Visit a winery: for the self-proclaimed wine enthusiast, visiting a winery may be the perfect winter activity. The grape harvest would have just finished but the cellars are now full of new-born bottles.

Take your time in a museum: visiting a museum can be an extraordinary experience, even more so when in a country with as much cultural heritage and history as Italy.In winter, crowds are considerably reduced making your visit peaceful and relaxed.

Italy is one place you must visit in your lifetime as it is full of rustic charm, delicious food and a fantastic atmosphere, which can be better enjoyed in the winter months. So, it is definitely time to start planning that last-minute winter break!

E*tra Vergine Oleoteca: the best Umbria can offer!

posted by Home In Italy on November 2nd, 2017

E*tra Vergine Oleoteca is a brand new concept, created by the eclectic architect and olive oil producer Monia Caneschi, whose passions for food, design and olive oil have been combined with those of Pierluigi Ceccarelli, professional sommelier and olive oil taster, who have been working with wine and gastronomy for the past 20 years. The result is a culinary oeuvre, a magic and unique place where it is possible to feel the intense dedication to quality and details. With 250 olive oil labels, all of them personally selected, the olive oil shop E*tra Vergine Oleoteca is an important national and international collection, offering the best Italian olive oil brands and products coming from abroad, all of them with the common characteristic of very high quality.

Oil is the main actor, but also wine, sauces, pasta and herbal liqueurs among other specialties give their contribution for a special evening and memorable culinary experience. The dedicated chef creates delicious plates different every day, depending on the fresh materials available, and with the constant leitmotif with are the olives.

A place where gastronomic culture is explored in the wider meaning, where you can talk about historical and cultural traditions related to the local and national food products and where it is possible to taste products of absolute excellence.

Book a villa in Umbria through Home in Italy and get a free olive oil tasting at the Oleoteca in Spello!

E*tra Vergine Oleoteca S.r.l.s.
Via Garibaldi, 9
Spello (Perugia)
Tel. 0742/651481
extravergineoleoteca@gmail.com

Admiring Giotto, Perugino and other Italian art treasures in Perugia

posted by Home In Italy on May 23rd, 2017

From 11th April to 15th September 2017, Vittorio Sgarbi, curator of the exhibition, presents a real temporal museum display entitled “From Giotto to Morandi. Art Treasures of Italian Foundations and Banks “. The exhibition is hosted in Palazzo Baldeschi, a historic building of extraordinary beauty in Perugia.

Visitors will feel as though they were going through the gates of a large national museum, such as visiting the Uffizi Gallery in Florence or the Capodimonte Museum in Naples.

It is a large patrimony, belonging to banks and foundations, which collects paintings of exceptional value, showing the historical and cultural features of the different territories of the Italian peninsula from the ’300s until the’ 900s, despite the variety of its composition.

This particular activity of collection represents an aspect of the more comprehensive cultural commitment of Banks and Foundations in a wider framework of activity and commitment to the community: purchase, recovery, restoration, and thus protection and enhancement of art works that would otherwise be dispersed.
The exhibition in Perugia takes into account the evolution of styles and provides an extensive overview of the subjects chosen by the artists. It ranges from the sacred theme to the allegorical and mythological representations, from the genre of the portrait to the ones of landscape and still life.
An appointment not to be missed if you are in Perugia or in Umbria for a weekly vacation.
For information on stays in Umbria please visit: http://www.homeinitaly.com/luxury-villas-umbria.php

BRONZE AGE IN SARDINIA: SU NURAXI IN BARUMINI

posted by Home In Italy on April 18th, 2017

The nuragic complex in Barumini is one of the largest and well preserved nuragic compounds, therefore it is the most important archeological site of Sardinia. Barumini is the name of the village where it is located in the central-south region of Sardinia.
Known as UNESCO World Heritage Site, “Su Nuraxi di Barumini” is the most complete nuragic site and at the same time it features an innovative and creative use of materials and techniques that were available to the prehistoric community.

The village of Barumini with its nuraghe “Su Nuraxi” shows that this territory has been inhabited since the Bronze Age (from 2300 to 700 B.C.).

The nuraghes used to serve as defensive turrets with the shape of a cone trunk, made by large dry stones, and equipped with internal rooms. The nuraghe in the village of Barumini is fenced in and surrounded by smaller towers interconnected by massive walls.

The village was composed by small circular houses, located around these main buildings. Besides, it is possible to find other spaces destined to specific domestic or ritual activities. The huts of the nuragic village date back to the VII-VI centuries B.C., when the territory was under the Punic and Roman rule.

Instead, the external wall curtain is even more ancient and implies the establishment of other populations during the Iron Age (between the ninth and the eighth century B.C.). This curtain is itself an adjustment to a front wall (i.e. a wall of first defense) incorporating the oldest part of the village which dates back to the Bronze Age, between the centuries XI and X B.C..

The peculiarity of Barumini is that you can visit not only a simple watchtower, even if particularly ancient, but you can also take a stroll through the remains of an entire village dating back to thousands of years ago.
The excavations carried out in 2015 have brought to light the foundations of one of the huts that was previously unknown along with the remains of sacrifices and rites involving the killing of animals. In particular, the bones of two small pigs were uncovered together with mussels’ valves, goats’ remains, pottery and charcoal fragments.

Barumini’s site is known throughout the world thanks to the excavations carried out in the 1950s by Giovanni Lilliu, an internationally renowned archaeologist who has discovered the nuragic site. These excavations have brought to the forefront the extraordinary nuragic civilization of the Mediterranean.

For those staying at villa Fenice in Villasimius, Barumini is 110 km far (about 1 hour 50 minutes).

You will find more information on the accommodation in Sardinia here:
http://www.homeinitaly.com/luxury-villas-sardinia.php

Also general information here:
http://www.homeinitaly.com/travel-route-sardinia.php