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posts tagged ‘ what to visit in Italy ’

Admiring Giotto, Perugino and other Italian art treasures in Perugia

posted by Home In Italy on May 23rd, 2017

From 11th April to 15th September 2017, Vittorio Sgarbi, curator of the exhibition, presents a real temporal museum display entitled “From Giotto to Morandi. Art Treasures of Italian Foundations and Banks “. The exhibition is hosted in Palazzo Baldeschi, a historic building of extraordinary beauty in Perugia.

Visitors will feel as though they were going through the gates of a large national museum, such as visiting the Uffizi Gallery in Florence or the Capodimonte Museum in Naples.

It is a large patrimony, belonging to banks and foundations, which collects paintings of exceptional value, showing the historical and cultural features of the different territories of the Italian peninsula from the ’300s until the’ 900s, despite the variety of its composition.

This particular activity of collection represents an aspect of the more comprehensive cultural commitment of Banks and Foundations in a wider framework of activity and commitment to the community: purchase, recovery, restoration, and thus protection and enhancement of art works that would otherwise be dispersed.
The exhibition in Perugia takes into account the evolution of styles and provides an extensive overview of the subjects chosen by the artists. It ranges from the sacred theme to the allegorical and mythological representations, from the genre of the portrait to the ones of landscape and still life.
An appointment not to be missed if you are in Perugia or in Umbria for a weekly vacation.
For information on stays in Umbria please visit: http://www.homeinitaly.com/luxury-villas-umbria.php

BRONZE AGE IN SARDINIA: SU NURAXI IN BARUMINI

posted by Home In Italy on April 18th, 2017

The nuragic complex in Barumini is one of the largest and well preserved nuragic compounds, therefore it is the most important archeological site of Sardinia. Barumini is the name of the village where it is located in the central-south region of Sardinia.
Known as UNESCO World Heritage Site, “Su Nuraxi di Barumini” is the most complete nuragic site and at the same time it features an innovative and creative use of materials and techniques that were available to the prehistoric community.

The village of Barumini with its nuraghe “Su Nuraxi” shows that this territory has been inhabited since the Bronze Age (from 2300 to 700 B.C.).

The nuraghes used to serve as defensive turrets with the shape of a cone trunk, made by large dry stones, and equipped with internal rooms. The nuraghe in the village of Barumini is fenced in and surrounded by smaller towers interconnected by massive walls.

The village was composed by small circular houses, located around these main buildings. Besides, it is possible to find other spaces destined to specific domestic or ritual activities. The huts of the nuragic village date back to the VII-VI centuries B.C., when the territory was under the Punic and Roman rule.

Instead, the external wall curtain is even more ancient and implies the establishment of other populations during the Iron Age (between the ninth and the eighth century B.C.). This curtain is itself an adjustment to a front wall (i.e. a wall of first defense) incorporating the oldest part of the village which dates back to the Bronze Age, between the centuries XI and X B.C..

The peculiarity of Barumini is that you can visit not only a simple watchtower, even if particularly ancient, but you can also take a stroll through the remains of an entire village dating back to thousands of years ago.
The excavations carried out in 2015 have brought to light the foundations of one of the huts that was previously unknown along with the remains of sacrifices and rites involving the killing of animals. In particular, the bones of two small pigs were uncovered together with mussels’ valves, goats’ remains, pottery and charcoal fragments.

Barumini’s site is known throughout the world thanks to the excavations carried out in the 1950s by Giovanni Lilliu, an internationally renowned archaeologist who has discovered the nuragic site. These excavations have brought to the forefront the extraordinary nuragic civilization of the Mediterranean.

For those staying at villa Fenice in Villasimius, Barumini is 110 km far (about 1 hour 50 minutes).

You will find more information on the accommodation in Sardinia here:
http://www.homeinitaly.com/luxury-villas-sardinia.php

Also general information here:
http://www.homeinitaly.com/travel-route-sardinia.php

RABBIT BEACH: THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BEACH IN ITALY

posted by Home In Italy on April 12th, 2017

If it is true the words of the French writer Jean-Claude Izzo that “in front of the beach happiness is a simple idea” the Rabbit Beach in Lampedusa, Cala Mariolu and Cala Goloritze in Ogliastra are the true “kings” of Italy. TripAdvisor are in fact leading the ranking of Italian Travelers’ Choice Beaches Awards 2017.

343 beaches awarded with the victory of Spain with La Concha in San Sebastian in Europe and Brazil with Baia do Sancho worldwide.

Regarding Italian beaches returned to the first position the Rabbits beach, climbing three steps of the ranking compared to last year, but the most awarded is Sardinia region with 5 beaches awarded to 10: in addition to Cala Mariolu and Cala Goloritze on the podium there are in fact La Pelosa in Stintino (5 / a), Port Rush Villasimius (6 / a) and is Aruttas in Cabras (10 / a).

Here below the Italian ranking:
1.Spiaggia dei Conigli, Lampedusa, Agrigento
2.Cala Mariolu, Baunei, Ogliastra
3.Cala Goloritze, Baunei, Ogliastra
4.Cala Rossa, Favignana, Trapani
5.La Pelosa, Stintino, Sassari
6.Porto Giunco, Villasimius, Cagliari
7.Baia del Silenzio, Sestri Levante, Genova
8.Cala Bianca, Marina di Camerota, Salerno
9.Spiaggia di Tropea, Tropea, Vibo Valentia
10.Is Aruttas, Cabras, Oristano

Here below more villas here near Stintino- Sardinia and near Agrigento- Sicily.

DISCOVERING PUGLIA: CANOSA DI PUGLIA

posted by Home In Italy on March 29th, 2017

Canosa di Puglia, small town located on the top of the hill of Puglia, became very famous and wealth between VI and III century B.C., when it was one of the most important place of the terracotta pots production. Canosa di Puglia is very famous also because is the testimony of numerous underground tombs, dug into the tuff: they were real bedrooms with rich architectural decorations of oriental influences (one of the most famous is the tomb of Gold jewelry, whore relics are kept with all at the Archeological Museum of Taranto). This period of prosperity faced a first break with the submission of the city to Rome and the tragic events of the battle of Cannae (216 BC): we will hear again about Canusium during the Augustan age, when it raised to the municipium rank. After the fall of the Roman Empire a new town took shape thanks to the bishop Sabino, who built many churches in the northeast slope of the hill. However, the destiny of the city was already outlined: the Byzantines preferred Bari and despite the short-lived revival desired by the Normans with the construction of the Cathedral, the city fell into anonymity.

In addition to the cathedral, among other interesting monuments there is the Iliceto Palace where there is the Civic Museum, the underground tombs of Lagrasta – one of the several Hellenistic era monuments -, the Sinesi Palace, headquarter of the archeological Foundation Canosa which offers interesting archeological exhibits, the Baptistery of St. John – built by Bishop Sabino over a Roman temple.

Find here more villas in the stunning Puglia.