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posts tagged ‘ what to visit in Italy ’

Otranto, east side of Puglia

posted by Home In Italy on November 19th, 2015

Otranto, facing towards the east, with its castle and cathedral, one of the most important witnesses of the Apulian Romanesque. Here you can admire the large Mosaic floor, millions of multicolored tiles that tell the story of the Old Testament, the cycle of each month of the year combined with the signs of Zodiac and the three of life along with themes from the chivalry cycles. It is one of the most important mosaic of the Italian Middle Ages.

Those who have the time to take a plunge in one of the most beautiful natural swimming pool, have to turn and go towards Torre dell’ Orso. On the coastline of Roca Vecchia you find Grotta della Poesia, an ancient place of worship invaded by the sea, whose walls are covered with mysterious inscriptions. There are many stories on this cave: From the story of a princess who loved to bathe, to the poets who came to the cave looking for inspiration. According to some people the water of the cave could give you eternal youth, according to others it is a gracious place to the oaths of love.

The truth is that during these days of autumn you most probably will be alone. Legends aside, having such an amazing miracle of nature all for you is not bad at all.

Florence in 2 days, 8 kms and 7 stops

posted by Home In Italy on November 17th, 2015

Basilica of St. Croce: the construction of the church began in 1295, but the neo-Gothic façade dates back to the nineteenth century. Inside, there are frescoes by Giotto on the life of St. Francis and the wooden crucifix by Donatello. The Pazzi Chapel demonstrates the perfection of the architecture of Brunelleschi.

Ponte Vecchio is the oldest bridge of the town. Rebuilt in 1345, it risked to be destroyed by the terrible floods of 1966. The arcades and the craftsmen (jewelers and goldsmiths) draw crowds of shoppers and onlookers.

Vasari Corridor: A striking passage, which tastes of secret and adventure, allows you to walk, unseen and “raised” from the Uffizi Gallery to the Pitti Palace. It was built in 1565 by the Grand Duke Cosimo I for safety reasons. The walk is between XVII and XVIII century art works and portraits and it takes place on the Old Bridge and crosses the houses d ‘Oltrarno.

Palazzo Pitti: this huge Renaissance palace dominates and frames the square on three sides. The palace was built and designed by Brunelleschi for a rival family of the Medici, the Pitti. In 1549, however, the palace was acquired by the wife of Cosimo I de ‘Medici, who turned it into a princely residence. With an extraordinary collection of paintings of sec. XVI, XVII and XVIII, including paintings by Raffaello and Tiziano, The Palazzo Pitti is one of the richest art galleries in the world.

Florence in 2 days, 8 kms and 7 stops

posted by Home In Italy on November 12th, 2015

A circular walk: from S. Maria del Fiore to the Uffizi, from Ponte Vecchio to Palazzo Pitti, from Masaccio to Ghirlandaio, from Michelangelo’s David and the Medici graves to the sweetness of Beato Angelico.

Piazza del Duomo: situated in the heart of the city, the complex (cathedral, bell tower and baptistery) forms an extraordinary set of white, green and pink, marble, a proof of the passage of the Florentine art from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance.
Piazza della Signoria: with the stunning background of the Palazzo vecchio, the Loggia and the Uffizi Gallery, the square Piazza della Signoria is still the political center of Florence. It dates back to the thirteenth century, when the Guelphs defeated the Ghibellines and destroyed the tower houses that they had erected in the center of the city. The numerous statues that populate the surroundings of the Palazzo Vecchio and the Loggia make it a veritable outdoor sculpture museum.

Uffizi Gallery is one of the richest museums in the world, whose collections allow us to follow the evolution of Italian painting from the primitive to the seventeenth century.

Salento during fall, deep blue sea

posted by Home In Italy on November 11th, 2015

From Otranto to Porto Cesareo no sign of someone, white villages surrounded by olive trees, sand dunes and cliffs caressed by the wind. Last swim, here we come!

This is the time that the sweetness of the sun covers the sea by rare and beautiful colors. You can look at the sea from a cliff, walking along the Mediterranean scrub lands, and the Adriatic sea water has the deep blue color of the sky.
Within one hour you are on the other side; enchanted by the transparent Ionian Caribbean, with its amazing white beaches.
The scent of juniper, rosemary and the lovely shade of the pinewood welcome you. This extreme offspring of Puglia, jutting out between two seas just like the bow of a ship, shows the best coast every day, depending on the direction of the wind. Just ask the local people.

Where would it be best to go today? Towards San Foca or Gallipoli instead? You turn the car and cross Salento. Or you go down south, in the direction of Santa Maria di Leuca. It is really worth it, even if it is just to see the sunset and the white light illuminates of Punta Meliso, which shines over the shoreline since the second half of ‘800.