europe +39 075 505 78 65 |  int. +1 646 934 6864 |   

Sardinia

a voyage over an emerald sea, past characteristic coves, and white sandy beaches

view villas

hii-not-miss Not to be missed



Beyond the hundreds of stunning beaches and coves around the island that will leave you awestruck for their pristine waters and pure white sand, Sardinia is filled with a unique culture and history to discover.

Explore Alghero’s old town, one of Sardinia’s most interesting and attractive towns, with a distinctive Catalan character. Take a stroll through its narrow cobbled streets packed with boutiques, bars and restaurant, marvel at the beautiful Cathedral of St. Mary and walk around the historic ramparts while breathing the sea breeze.

Whether you choose to swim, snorkel or cruise through the clear water of these spectacular islands, there is no location more idyllic than the stunning Maddalena archipelago, offshore gems, easily reached by boat from Palau on the northern coast.

Explore the picturesque former fishing village of Villasimius and Cagliari, Sardinia’s fascinating capital city. Immerse yourself in the culture of its noble palaces while strolling through the alleys of the historic center, among its landmarks don’t miss the rampart of Saint Remy, and the Sanctuary of Nostra Signora di Bonaria.

Enjoy a drink in one of the waterfront bars in Porto Cervo, soak up the marvelous views and the upscale vibe of this exclusive area located in the north of the island.



Culinary wonders


Discover the mouth-watering, traditional cuisine of Sardinia, the island boasts a rich culinary history and you can indulge in delicious dishes in any restaurant of the island from the simple and authentic countryside trattorias to the most glamorous restaurant in Porto Cervo.

Seafood obviously plays an important role in the Sardinian diet. Breams, mullets and sea bass are widely available, lobsters are typically found in the Alghero area. The most popular dish of the island is roast suckling pig, spit-roasted over an open fire as well as other meat dishes such as muttons and boars. Thanks to the island’s local tradition of shepherds, cheese lovers will be overwhelmed by the great variety, hard and soft, mild or tangy, hard pecorino or soft ricotta. The meal is usually accompanied by the typical pane carasau, a simple and thin wafer that can also be brushed with local genuine olive oil and sprinkled with salt. No meal is complete without tasting the traditional seadas, a dessert made by fried puff pastry filled with hot cheese and sprinkled with honey or sugar. Each area of the island boasts its own excellent production of wines, local red wines are strong and full-bodied and marry particularly well with roast meats and cheeses, while local white wines are mainly dry and make the perfect match with seafood dishes.

Sports and leisure in Sardinia


There is no better way to discover Sardinia’s coast or countryside than on a relaxing horseback ride. Horseback journeys hold a long tradition throughout Sardinia that boasts a great network of coastal paths and bridleways all around the island, with numerous excursions available for all abilities.

Getting off the beaten track is the best way to see Sardinia’s startlingly beautiful coastlines and unspoilt hinterland, the island offers some great hiking trails. One of the most beautiful trekking areas is along the Supramonte massif, which runs from Nuoro to Baunei on the east coast boasting hidden canyons and old villages immersed in strikingly beautiful nature.

With 2000km/1250miles of coastline the island offers a great variety of water sports, more in particular, with winds blowing from every direction, it is a paradise for windsurfers and kitesurfers.

Sardinia’s underwater world is just as diverse and varied as its island scenery, there are countless dive sites around Sardinia. Snorkelers will be amazed by translucent waters, sunken ship wrecks, rugged rocks, rare shells and the exceptional multitude of fish.

Sardinia’s lush green golf courses belong to the most beautiful in the Mediterranean area. With its breathtaking sea views the Pevero Golf Club is the most famous of them, situated on the Smeralda coast dominating the two bays of Cala di Volpe and Volpero.

The island also offers endless possibilities to bike lovers, the coastal flatland is perfect for more easy-going adventures, whereas the island’s hilly inland is the best option for professional bikers.

Around Sardinia


There are over 2000 ancient Nuraghi (stone huts) still standing around the island. The nuragic complex in Barumini, UNESCO World Heritage Site, is one of the largest and well preserved nuragic compounds, therefore it is the most important archeological site of Sardinia. You can visit the simple watchtower as well as take a stroll through the impressive remains of an entire village dating back to the bronze age.

Step back in time to the age of Romans and explore the two impressive archaeological sites of Nora and Tharros, on the south and west coasts, soak up all the history while enjoying the breathtaking settings.

Discover the unique medieval village of Castelsardo located in the middle of the Gulf of Asinara, visit its 12th century Doria castle, take a stroll through its steep streets and enjoy some of the finest Sardinian craft boutiques.

Top 5 beaches


The island’s coastline is among the most rewarding in the Mediterranean, choosing from the myriad of spectacular beaches of Sardinia can be challenging, here is our Top 5 selection:
1. Cala Brandinchi: situated in the north-east of the island, a sweeping bay with translucent shallow waters perfect for swimming, soft sand surrounded by pine trees offering a serene atmosphere.
2. La Pelosa beach: situated in the north-west, fine, pure white sand, a transparent seabed, ankle-deep waters, turquoise and blue colours of a sea blending with the sky and a captivating landscape offered by the surrounding sea stacks, a true Sardinian oasis.
3. Cala Mariolu: a precious cove found on the east coast, turquoise water, a memorable setting, and one of the best locations for snorkelling in the island thanks to the abundance of fish.
4. Cala Biriola: immersed in the lush vegetation of the east coast, a cosy and paradisiacal beach perfect for those seeking privacy and relaxation in one of the most picturesque spots of the island.
5. Poetto beach: located near Cagliari, a long strip of coastal perfection, a vibrant atmosphere defined by bars, eateries and exciting water sports. The beach is also backed by two ponds, where it is possible to spot pink flamingos.



icon-calendar When to go


Sardinia boasts a beautifully warm Mediterranean climate and is renowned for its 'six-month summer' meaning that the sea can be warm enough for swimming from May until October.

The winds, especially the Mistral and Ponente, mostly characterize the weather of this region. Spring time, from April to June, is a lovely season to visit the island, the flowers are in bloom, and the temperatures haven't yet reached their July and August peaks.

The summer months are characterized by heat and full sun, however the pleasant coastal breeze and the incredibly refreshing sea waters make the temperature bearable. Also, the endless variety of beautiful beaches on the island allows to find the perfect secluded beach spot and escape the heavy crowds. Summer is also the liveliest time of the year with a great variety of festivals and exclusive events. With mild weather and fewer crowds September and October are also a good option to explore this unique territory.



icon-temperature Average temperatures


January

10°

February

11°

March

12°

April

14°

May

17°

June

21°

July

24°

August

25°

September

22°

October

18°

November

13°

December

11°